08VIP体育官网-マ゚ツキシイ秬サカモュト

 C h e l y d r a . O r g         

Snapping Turtles & Things 
Art  | Photography 
Main Page      | Help | About us | Contact 
 [ Updated ]
 
  Powered by 1&1
  Banner
 


   Main Page

  PUBLISHERS & BUYERS 
   sponsorship
   donations
   publishers
   advertisers
   webstats
   turtle store
   
   contact webmaster
   sign/view guestbook

  INTRODUCTION / HELP 
   turtle train
   walk turtle style
   help & sitemap
   snapping turtle club
   questions & answers
   question of the week
   + past entries
   ask question
   message forum
   turtle chat

  BASIC FACTS 
   what's a turtle ?
   prehistory
   basic anatomy
   + comm. snapper skull
   + allig. snapper skull
   + turtle embryo
   turtle dictionary
   classification

  COMMON 
  SNAPPING TURTLES 

   classification
   identification
   common vs. alligator
   4 subspecies
   + c.s.serpentina
   + c.s.osceola
   + c.s.rossignoni
   + c.s.acutirostris
   prehistory
   geographic range
   habitat
   behavior
   growth
   growth charts
   longevity
   feeding habits
   reproduction

  IN CAPTIVITY 
   acquiring a turtle
   handling snappers
   tank
   enclosure setup
   water
   filtration
   heater
   lighting
   basking light
   basic care
   feeding
   health checkups
   reptile vets
   incubator
   hatchlings

  ALLIGATOR SNAPPING
  TURTLES 

   classification
   identification
   common vs. alligator
   prehistory
   geographic range
   habitat
   behavior
   growth
   growth charts
   longevity
   feeding habits
   reproduction

  ALLIGATOR SNAPPERS 
  IN CAPTIVITY 

   acquiring a turtle
   handling snappers
   tank
   enclosure setup
   water
   filtration
   heater
   lighting
   basking light
   feeding

  ARTICLES 
   turtle personalities
   way of a hunter
   master strategist
   do they really bask ?
   climbing champions
   albino turtles
   trapping & relocation
   traveling with turtles
   misc

  REPTILE VETS 
   reptile vets - intro
   choosing a vet
   finding a vet
   reptile vet listings
   + vets USA
   + vets Canada
   + vets World

  BREEDERS 
  & PET SHOPS 

   pet shops vs. breeders
   pet shop listings
   breeders

  SNAPPERS & LAW 
   C.I.T.E.S.
   trade
   import & export
   laws for Canadians
   laws for USA

  PHOTO GALLERIES 
   common snappers
   alligator snappers
   photos by guests
   albino turtles
   turtles & our cultures
   reptile art
   other species photos

 DOWNLOADS 
   royalty free photos
   free puzzles

  OTHER TURTLE SPECIES 
   photos
   information

  BITS & PIECES 
   post a message
   links
   books
   credits
   copyright info
   about me
  
  Powered by 1&1
  Banner
 
  Sponsor links  
   Pure Healthy Water
 
 THIS PAGE IS DEDICATED TO THE SNAPPING TURTLES  
 and PEOPLE WHO LOVE THEM  
   bookmark us
 

Question of the month - past entries 


             Scroll down to read the answers.
             Current entry click here.

Entry #1

You wrote:

' My name is Jeremy and I was wandering if my recently aquired baby common snapper could eventually go in the same tank/pond with my 5 inch now red eared slider. Ive seen them as babies in an aquaruim together, but i was wandering if they would fight if kept together when they were bigger.

Thank you,
Jeremy '


Answer:

It is not recommended, but just for a short time should be ok. You should soon seperate them though (within few monthes). The snapper will grow much faster than the other turtle, will become big pretty soon and having big apetite might bite the other turtle. An injured turle will become target to even more biting and might die in the end.

The snapper wouldn't see the other turtle simply as food at first, but might bite because of a self-defence reflex, just seing something move quickly might scare it and make it 'snap'. Then, the injured turtle might somewhat make it think of food and stimulate into more biting at the bleeding area.

An adult snapper will simply think 'food' when with another creature in the same enclosure.

It is recommended to keep them seperate from start. I wouldn't take the chance.

Thanks for writing!
Stan

Entry #2

You wrote:

' Thank you for your informative website.

I was told that common snapping turtles shed their shells when they die. Could you please tell me if what I was told is true? Thank you. I've looked for this information all over the web.

Sincerely, Anne Jones '


Answer:

Hi Anne,

No, they don't shed their shells when they die, but I wish they could leave their shells once in a while when alive! They would be like plump and quite cute lizards then, great to hold! LOL

When snappers die, they basically stay as they are until the nature strips them from flesh during the process of decay leaving only bones and the shell. This work is done first by larger animals which might just eat the dead turtle, then insects, worms and eventually bacteria. The scutes that cover the bony shell, because of being fragile in comparison, will eventually peel off and what's left from a turtle after few months is a lot of scattered bones (if you could find them) and the white bare shell without the horny scutes. Marine turtles and the giant land tortoises have heavy skulls and probably you would also find it somewhere nearby.

Thanks for writing!
Stan

Entry #3

You wrote:

' Hello,

I have a question about my snapping turtles feeding habits. Most turtle care FAQs say to feed your turtle 2-3 times a week. We feed our turtle a balance of Reptile sticks and Rosie Red live fish. How many fish should we feed him at a time? One suggestion we received was to feed him until he is now longer interested in food, but just last week he ate all 30 feeder fish we put in his tank in 24 hours. Are we overfeeding him? He's probably about 5 inches long and seems very healthy. It's just that he eats ALOT!

Thanks for any advice you can give me.
Morgan '


Answer:

Hi, You are doing fine. Your turtle is still a baby and growing, so it will eat lots - just like it would in nature. Snappers are opportunistic and usually stuff themselves with food when hungry. If you give it few days without food then such feasting translates into a healthy snapper with a healthy appetite. Overfeeding would be giving it tonnes of food everyday - this would not be good. Just like with dogs and cats, we feed them only at certain time in a day. Snacks between meals are not recommended - they make them fat (just like they make us fat too!).

So, even if your turtle will 'beg' for food give it 2-3 day break and then let it eat all he wants! They sometimes go for days without food in nature and then have a big meal, so letting it fill up during meal does not mean overfeeding.

The fish that you give it is probably not very large, so actually this quantity does not surprise me.

You have a growing healthy snapper, keep it up!

Thanks for writing!
Stan

Entry #4 - current entry click here

More reading & related links:
 
        Basic snapping turtle info in one file - Introduction to snapping turtles.pdf (116 Kb)  

             Current entry click here.

 


          
back to top      



Google
 
Web www.www.chaozhoug.tw

© 1998-2006 Stan Gielewski, All Rights Reserved.

Map IP Address
Powered byIP2Location.com

08VIPフ衲ケルヘ <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ヨゥヨエハ>| <ホトアセチエ> <ホトアセチエ> <ホトアセチエ> <ホトアセチエ> <ホトアセチエ> <ホトアセチエ>